Top 5% of Patent Lawyers in Springfield, Massachusetts | UpCounsel

Springfield Patent Attorneys & Lawyers

Gloria M. Steinberg Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

194 reviews

Johnny Manriquez Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

87 reviews

Matt Googe Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

52 reviews

Donald Wenskay Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

David Lorenz Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

2 reviews

Alexandra Cavazos Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

Tolga Gulmen Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

2 reviews

Diana Mederos Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

Joseph Gross Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

27 reviews

Margaret (Margie) O'connor Patent Lawyer for Springfield, MA

Springfield Patent Lawyers

5.0 
Based on 1266 reviews
Clear Communication - 5.0
Response Time - 5.0
Knowledgeable - 4.9
Meets Deadlines - 5.0
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Legal Services Offered by Our On-Demand Springfield Patent Attorneys

Our experienced Springfield patent attorneys & lawyers represent individuals and businesses throughout the world with domestic and foreign patent preparation and prosecution matters. They have extensive experience handling applications from nearly every sector of technology, including biotechnology, computer hardware and software, communication networks, internet systems and methods, automotive, medical equipment, construction technology, consumer electronics, and clean technology research and development.

Our patent attorneys are of the most highly trained in the industry, requiring a scientific background, and passing a second level of testing known as the Patent Bar Examination. Thousands of patents are submitted to the patent office every day and a patent committee reviews each patent for its validity. The process requires that correctly drafted documentation present a clear case for the novelty of the invention, which is best made by a patent attorney with a higher education background in your industry.

Our Springfield patent attorneys & lawyers can help you file a provisional patent, which lasts for 1-year and allows you to immediately begin using/manufacturing your invention with the confidence that your idea is protected. These types of patents are great if you think your idea will change a lot over the next year before you file a (non-provisional) patent. These patents are easier to obtain and are less expensive but you should have a patent lawyer review your provisional patent application to insure that you are meeting your objectives when you file your patent.

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