1. New York LLC Search
2. Conducting a New York LLC Search
3. Pros of Starting an LLC
4. Cons of Starting an LLC
5. How to Form an LLC
6. New York LLC Costs
7. State Contact Information

A New York LLC search, also known as a New York business entity search, is a search conducted to obtain information about an existing business or to see if the name you desire for your business is available in New York. If the search is done for information on an existing business, the following information is usually what is searched for:

If the search is done to help choose a new business name, you should remember that there are guidelines for choosing this name. Fortunately, the LLC search will help you navigate them.

You can conduct a New York LLC search here. From this page, you can:

  • Search by name.
    • Be sure your name is entered exactly as you want it. If it is taken, a similar variation may not be.
  • Filter by status.
    • Under the “Status” button, you can choose to search all entities or only active ones.
  • Filter by type.
    • “Begins With” filtering lets you search by what a name begins with.
    • Partial filtering lets you search by what words a name contains.
    • Contains filtering lets you search by what parts of words a name contains. However, this can yield a vast amount of results.

You can also check LLC name availability at the New York Department of State website. This can be done by going through the first part of the order form, which will also show you if your desired name is available. Once you have found out if it is, you no longer need to continue the form.

Additional steps to take in the name selection process include:

  • Checking for URL availability.
    • You may not plan on having a business website now, but you may want one in the future. If so, a URL containing your business name makes sense.
  • Checking for email address availability.
    • Similarly, if you have an email address for your business, it’s better if it matches your business name.

Pros of Starting an LLC

The advantages of starting an LLC include:

  • Pass-through taxes. Filing a corporate tax return is unnecessary with an LLC. LLC owners record profit and loss on their 1040 form, so there is no double taxation.
  • No residency requirement. You can own an LLC without being a permanent resident or U.S. citizen.
  • Legal protection. An LLC offers you limited liability on your business obligations and debts.
  • Credibility enhancement. Suppliers, lenders, and partners will be more inclined to work with you if you have an LLC.

Cons of Starting an LLC

The disadvantages of starting an LLC include:

  • Lower potential for growth. Stock cannot be issued to attract investors.
  • Lesser uniformity. Different states have different rules for LLCs.
  • Self-employment tax. This can apply to LLC earnings.
  • Taxes on your appreciated assets. Converting a business into an LLC may cause these to apply.

How to Form an LLC

To create an LLC in New York, follow these steps:

  1. Create and reserve a name.
  2. Create and file Articles of Incorporation with the Secretary of State.
  3. Decide if members or managers will operate the business.
  4. Decide on the number of owners.
  5. Apply for the necessary business licenses and certificates.
  6. File Form SS-4 or get your Employer Identification Number from the IRS.
  7. Get any other required ID numbers, which can vary from local jurisdiction. Disability, payroll tax, and unemployment ID numbers are some examples.

New York LLC Costs

Costs associated with forming an LLC include:

  • A New York state fee of $200.
  • A Certificate of publication fee of $50.
  • A Biennial statement fee of $9 every 2 years.

State Contact Information

The New York Department of State can be contacted via:

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