1. Company Name LLC
2. Using LLC in the Business Name
3. Choosing Your LLC Name

Company Name LLC

Using the company name LLC means you have set up a limited liability company. You will use LLC after your company name once you incorporate, showing that you are a legal and functioning corporation.

Using LLC in the Business Name

After you have chosen to set up your company as a limited liability company, also known as an LLC, you next need to choose the business name. You will need to have a business name nailed down before you register as an LLC. This is not a small decision. Your LLC name will be a key identifier of your business that help you become marketable.

You need to be certain of your LLC company name. While you can change it, it will take considerable work to do so. Additionally, if you have been in business for a long time with your current LLC name, you could stand to lose all the brand recognition you have developed over the years, causing a dip in revenue.

There are several advantages of having a LLC designation within your business name, such as:

  • Showing LLC in your business name will show customers that you have gone the extra mile in registering your business. It shows that your business is reputable, professional, and is serious. This is particularly important when starting a new venture.
  • LLC in your business name demonstrates that your business is separate from your personal interests. It shows clients that they are dealing with you as a business and not as a private citizen.

It is crucial that you carefully think about when you are selecting the name for your company, as it will serve as the foundation of your brand. Think about how your company name will appear on your various marketing tools, including logos, signage, social media, and business cards. Keep in mind that your name is going to be part of what defines your business, so it needs to be professional but should also evoke meaning to your customer base.

Choosing Your LLC Name

Choosing an LLC name is not going to be as easy as choosing your name and filing some paperwork. You will have to satisfy several legal requirements to obtain your LLC name. You will also need to make sure that you are not choosing a name that has already been registered. To begin the selection of your LLC name, you should first start a list of the names that you like and best suit your company.

Creating a list lets you go through the business name search all at once rather than individually. That way, you are not wasting time if your first choices are already taken. Having several options to choose from helps ensure you will select an ideal name as quickly as possible so that you can get the registration process going.

Keep in mind that just because a business name is not registered does not mean there are no legal rights attached to it. It is wise to do some research to be certain that no business is using a name before you choose it yourself.

It can be frustrating during a name search when your favorite names appear to be in use. However, it is a proper practice to modify your desired name somewhat to tailor it to your product or service.

While you can modify a name that is already in use, it can be problematic as your business grows into different regions. If you move into a market where a similar company name is used, it can be barred if it is already heavily established in that region. If you are planning on expanding, be sure you fully research your options based on presently established companies.

This also goes if you plan to stay in your local market. If there is a business or company in your current market with a name that you want to use, it is best not to use that name or any variation of it. The best way around any issues is to just choose a brand new, completely different name.

If you need help with choosing a company name with an LLC, you can post your legal need on UpCounsel’s marketplace. UpCounsel accepts only the top 5 percent of lawyers to its site. Lawyers on UpCounsel come from law schools such as Harvard Law and Yale Law and average 14 years of legal experience, including work with or on behalf of companies like Google, Menlo Ventures, and Airbnb.