1. Business Plan: Introduction
2. Questions to Ask When Writing a Business Plan

What are the questions to ask when starting a business plan? When you are starting to build your own business, details can be overwhelming. Asking questions about the purpose and operations of your business and documenting the answers is the first step to creating a business plan.

Business Plan: Introduction

  • A business plan lets you know where you are and where you want to go. If you don't have experience running a business, you may not know where to start.
  • Your business plan can help you figure out how to find an investor or get a business loan.
  • Writing down your questions will help you answer them later. The better organized the map is, the more likely you'll reach your destination.
  • Don't think your business plan is not important. It's actually the backbone of your company and a foundation from which your business will be built.
  • It will serve as a roadmap for the business in the first several years of starting.
  • There are no particular rules or requirements you have to follow when writing a business plan such as a particular length, subject matter, presentation or format.

Questions to Ask When Writing a Business Plan

What kind of need will your business satisfy? Each business exists because there's an opportunity to be filled. You have to define the need and/or problem you are solving.

How will your business satisfy this need? Introduce the business itself. Include a mission or vision statement with the objective detailing how the business satisfies the market.

What need are you improving? If you are excited about the idea of people buying your product or service because it provides something useful, it's hard to be critical of your business. You have to think about the driving force of your customer's buying habits and why they buy.

How is your business different? Describe your business and what differentiates it from other businesses. This way you can understand the unique attributes that will attract customers.

Why is your business unique? Chances are high that a similar business to yours already exists, even if it's a start-up in another town. Strive to offer a new solution to an old problem or a level of service that goes above and beyond the standard for your local industry.

Who are the main players in your business? Name the board, advisers, and management team in the business. Highlight their experiences and expertise.

What's the size of your market? Once you understand the market you are getting into such as the size, profit potential, and attractiveness, then you can understand if there's opportunity.

Who will be your customers? By narrowing your client base, you can define your marketing strategy. You can't serve everyone. Think about factors such as age, sex and working status to do some initial market research.

Who will be your demographic? Your demographic can evolve over time, so don't commit to one niche. You can also expand to other markets once you have expanded to other markets.

What are your business economics? Understand where your money is coming from such as margins, expenses, and pricing structure. You have to know how, where, and how much are you going to sell.

What are your operating expenses? Who are you going to pay, what services and partners do you need to pay, and how much do you need to sell to be more than what you owe.

How much money do you need to start a business and continue making money? Understand the capital requirements to know where your business is now, and what's needed to continue forward.

How will you promote business? You have to have a marketing strategy similar to other businesses.

What do I need to get started? All businesses have to start somewhere, and this varies from business to business. Who do you need to hire? How much money do you need? These are the questions you should ask to know what money you will need?

Your business plan needs to evolve as your business grows.

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