What Is the Ohio Business Name Search?

The Ohio Business Name Search is used to determine whether the name being considered for a business is already in use by another entity. It is used to gather information on an existing business such as if the business is in good standing, the business address, and registered agent's address. The business name search can also be used if an LLC needs a certified copy of its Ohio Articles of Organization.

Steps for Searching by Name

  1. Type into the search field the exact current or past business name. Click "search."
  2. A list of all names that match your search criteria will be displayed. Review the list. Once you find the business name, click the entity number to continue.
  3. The details of the business name chosen on the previous page will be displayed. The information provides a history of the entire filing process as well as links to images.

Steps for Searching for a Detailed Business

  1. Use the detailed search option when the name of the business, the type of business, its status, or the business location is known.
  2. Once the search is initiated, a page will be displayed listing the results of your search parameters. To read more details about a specific business, click the entity number listed alongside the business name.
  3. The information displayed will include images and document numbers attached to submitted files.

Steps for Searching by Number

  1. For a more refined search, use the option of typing in the registration number or the document ID.
  2. When the search results are displayed for the single specified number or ID, the information available will include status, effective date, business type, and location.
  3. An entity number will also be displayed, which is clicked to continue onto the next business details page. The details page allows the user to view all recorded files related to the number or ID.

Steps for Searching by Contact or Agent Name

  1. Type the appropriate name, if known, into the search box along with the identifier attached to the name, such as the corporation name, the person who registered the business, or the registered agent.
  2. The search results will show a list of the designated officials for the entity. To retrieve information about the entity, click the entity number displayed in the left column.
  3. After clicking the entity number, another page is displayed with details of the business entity that were supplied in the documents when the entity was initially formed. To view any additional filings by the entity, click the document ID.

Steps for Searching by Name Availability

  1. Decide on the official name the business will be using.
  2. Once a name has been chosen, use the availability tool to determine if it is available for use.

FAQs

  • What is a DBA?

DBA stands for “doing business as.” Using a DBA allows a person to register their business under another name instead of the owner's legal name. A registered DBA is a fully legal and operational business.

  • Do I need a DBA?

In Ohio, a DBA is a requirement if someone plans to use a fictitious name in lieu of the owner's name.

  • How do I set up a DBA?

In Ohio, contact the county clerk's office for a search of the name to be used for the business entity to determine if the name is available.

When registering and filing a business, the information needed includes the name of the person filing, the business' name and its principal location, and the type of business operating under the designated name.

  • Besides selecting an appropriate business name, is there anything else needed?

Yes. There are two things to consider when setting up a DBA entity. If the business is going to have an internet presence, such as a website, check with domain name companies to find out whether the name of the company has a corresponding URL that is available. If no web presence is anticipated, consider setting up an email account specifically for the business entity.

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