Top 5% of Employment Lawyers in Kansas City, Kansas | UpCounsel

Kansas City Employment Attorneys & Lawyers

Steven Stark Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

169 reviews

Joshua Garber Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

146 reviews

Steve Lucero Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

2 reviews

Alexander Eichler Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

Ian Stock Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

2 reviews

Bryan Reddix Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

2 reviews

Lisa Howley Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

Genelle Franklin Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

Jessica Gutteridge Employment Lawyer for Kansas City, KS

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Legal Services Offered by Our On-Demand Kansas City Employment Attorneys

Our experienced Kansas City employment attorneys & lawyers can help guide you on how to proceed with various employee decisions such as reviewing employee documents such as contracts, agreements, policies, and handbooks, along with difficult decisions such as firing, lawsuits, claims, and complaints.

Although not every single employment contract will require legal assistance, many employment lawyers would recommend avoiding unilateral employment contracts that strongly benefit one side over the other. These types of employee contracts rarely hold up in court, yet having the funds needed to combat an issue in court can limit the employee’s options.

A confidentiality agreement and a non-compete agreement are common forms of employee contracts that one of our Kansas City employment attorneys can help customize for your business. If your business needs to fire an employee, proper measures should be taken from a business legal standpoint to ensure proper communication and a smooth transition of dismissing that employee. In any case, we suggest you connect with our employment attorneys to discuss your options.

If You Need Ongoing Legal Counsel or Ad-hoc Legal Work - We Can Help!

Improve Your Legal ROI with Affordable Employment Attorneys that service Kansas City, KS.

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